Bakeng Deuce High-Altitude Climb Rate

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Bakeng Deuce High-Altitude Climb Rate

Arizona Bill
Hello Bakeng Duce/Deuce Owners and Pilots,

My name is Bill Palmer, and I am new to this forum.  I have always liked the Bakeng Duce/Deuce, and I would like to find out more about it.  I have reviewed the Deuce specifications on this website, and the specified performance looks fine except for the 12,000 ft Service Ceiling (at 100 ft/min climb) with an O-320.  To me, 12,000 ft seems more like the Service Ceiling for the original 0-290-powered Duce than for an O-320-powered Deuce.  Does anyone have some “actual” high-altitude climb rate data to offer?

Some Definitions for your loose consideration:

Service Ceiling:  The maximum density altitude at which the sustained climb rate with a “normal” payload* drops to 100 ft/min.  Or, more practical for us, the maximum indicated altitude (with current barometric setting) at which the sustained climb rate with a “normal” payload* drops to 100 ft/min; with standard temperature (approx. 60 deg F) at sea level.  (Caveat: The Service Ceiling definition can certainly get a lot more technical and precise, but who cares?)

* For practical purposes, one or two persons and approximate fuel remaining (quarter, half, three-quarters) at altitude.

Absolute Ceiling:  The maximum indicated altitude (with current barometric setting) at which the maximum-power climb rate with a “normal” payload* drops to zero (just above stall); with standard temperature (approx. 60 deg F) at sea level.  (Caveat the same as before.)

From the “Hall of Fame:”

I see that the Deuce has been climbed to 14,000 ft (still climbing, but pilot oxygen-limited) and 15,500 ft is the record.  I assume 15,500 ft is an Absolute Ceiling number, but I’m not sure.  There is also a report that a Canadian Deuce climbed to 16,000 ft.

Well, anyway, I am wondering what a Deuce’s “real world,” high-altitude climb performance is.  Does anyone have sustained climb rate data at, say, 8,000 feet with a 150hp O-320 or 160hp O/IO-320?  Anything you can contribute to our mutual understanding of “actual” Deuce high-altitude climb rate would be greatly appreciated.  Precision is not required!  If it’s real good data, I’ll mail you a gift card for a hamburger!  If you can estimate a reasonable “actual” Deuce Service Ceiling number with forum consensus, it’s a hamburger meal!

Thanks, and Best Regards,

Bill Palmer
Mogollon Airpark, Overgaard, AZ
Email: billairman@yahoo.com